Tag Archives: affirmations

The Option of Low-Key Greatness

Successes are the side effects, not the goals of living.

Coaches, lecturers and self-help experts spend a lot of time telling you how to be greater, achieve more, improve your self-worth. I admit I’ve done the same thing in the past, and I’ll probably do it again, when it seems appropriate.

But just for now, just for the next two or three minutes, let’s set aside our to-do lists, our goal sheets and our dream boards. Let’s not talk about goals or achievement at all. No affirmations, no law of attraction stuff, no power-packed visualizations.

Who’s That Knockin’ on Your Door?

Missing Messages

Imagine this: You’re at a friend’s house, cheerfully chatting, and there’s a knock at the front door. But your friend makes no move to go see who it is. The knocking continues, gradually becoming more insistent, but still your friend ignores it.

Finally, you offer, “Don’t you think you should go see about that?”

Taking Permanent Control of Your Moods

Your Mental State Is in Your Hands

I sure do hope you’re not typical … because the typical person has little control over how they’ll feel when they get up tomorrow.

Most days, they feel like a pinball. They crawl out of bed expecting that — again today — they’re going to be bounced from one obstacle to another, pushed this way and that, and rolled helplessly into an unending stream of unexpected experiences.

Control Your Words — Control Your Destiny

Undependable

Mike had run into a stubborn little glitch with his affirmations. “When I say the word ‘productive,’ he told me, “I get a little spike of self-doubt.”

Each time Mike affirmed that he was productive, it stirred up in him a deep feeling of mis-match — what psychologists call cognitive dissonance. This basically means he was trying to believe two things that contradict each other. At the gut level, Mike “knew” that he was UN-productive, so strong doubts came welling up within him.

Everything ALWAYS Works Right

Failing Takes a Lot of Effort

“Son,” my Dad would say, “You could screw up a one-man funeral.” I don’t know how many thousands of times my father told me that while I was growing up, but it soaked in pretty deeply.

By the time I reached adulthood, I was convinced; nothing would ever work right for me; if there was a way to mess things up, I’d always find it. That was just a fact of my existence: I was a screwup.